New Albany Mayors Court

New Albany Mayors Court

New Albany Mayors Court

Outside of New Albany Mayors Court located in the Village Clerk's building.

Have you been charged with a crime in New Albany Mayors Court?  We at Wolfe Legal Services know the Prosecutor, Martin Nobile and the Magistrate, Sean Maxfield who preside at New Albany Mayors Court and we can help obtain you a favorable outcome in your criminal or traffic case.  The most common charges in New Albany Mayors Court are OVI (DUI), driving under suspension, and theft.  Many times an attorney can enroll you in a diversion program or give advice which results in reduced charges.  Always contact an attorney for a free consultation before going to Court.  Never plead guilty without contacting a lawyer first, because some charges can stay on your criminal record for life, even charges in Mayor's Court.

The Mayors Court hears misdemeanor cases alleged to be in violation of New Albany Ordinances.  The Court does not hear second offense driving under the influence (OVI), second offense driving under OVI suspensions or financial responsibility (FRA) suspensions, and domestic violence cases.  Those cases are referred to the Franklin County Municipal Court. There are several interesting facts you should know about New Albany Mayors Court: 1. You can have your case heard in New Albany Mayor's Court and if you don't like the outcome, you can have a new trial at the Franklin County Municipal Court. 2. There are no jury trials in New Albany Mayor's Court. 3. Mayor's Court is not conducted by the Mayor, but rather, a Magistrate, Sean Maxfield.

The first step of the process is Arraignment, in which you enter a plea of guilty or not guilty.  By hiring a lawyer, you can many times avoid this court date and the attorney will file a "not guilty" plea for you.  Even if you are guilty, we recommend filing a not guilty plea in order to have time to review the evidence and enter plea negotiations.  Sometimes the Prosecutor won't have enough evidence to prove a guilty person guilty, resulting in reduction or dismissal of the case.

Once the evidence (discovery) is obtained by your lawyer, the case is reviewed with Marty at a pre-trial to determine if you and the State can come to a plea agreement, often referred to as "plea bargaining."    If there is no agreement or you are not guilty, you can have a trial.

Theoretically you can have a bench trial to the Magistrate in New Albany Mayor's Court, but usually we recommend transferring your case to Franklin County Municipal Court or Licking County Municipal Court, depending on where the allegations were made.   Jury trials for OVI (DUI) and other offenses are routinely conducted in Franklin County and Licking County Municipal Court. Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Mantel is assigned to all New Albany cases in Franklin County Municipal Court, while the Newark Law Director handles cases tried in Licking County Municipal Court.

It is strongly recommended you get a Columbus Criminal Defense Attorney before going into a court room.

If you did not provide proof of insurance to the Police at the time of your traffic stop, you must bring proof of insurance to your court appearance.   Failure to provide proof of insurance will result in the suspension of your license for at least 90 days through the Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

The City of New Albany Mayor’s Court is located in the New Albany Village Hall, 99 West Main Street, New Albany, Ohio. Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Phone: 614-855-8577; Fax: 614-855-0082

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